Getting Around Bratislava: From the Airport to the City Centre

After the confusion I have had myself over the years, I thought a few notes on Bratislava’s actually very good but initially flummoxing public transport system might come in handy. There is very little thorough info in English on the web so: voila. This post is about getting from Bratislava Airport, aka M. R. Štefánik Airport (which is the way nearly all Brits arrive) to the centre.

Arriving at Bratislava’s Airport

Slovakia does not have its own airline, meaning Ryanair has almost become the (bone-shakingly bumpy) substitute. Don’t worry though: most flights still land with almost zero fatality rate. There is a reason a lot of British visitors arrive by air other than simple logistics: Bratislava is connected to London Luton, London Stansted, Birmingham, Liverpool and Edinburgh – making the UK easily the most connected country to Slovakia by air. (NB – you can also fly from London to Košice and from London to Poprad in the High Tatras).

Once through customs, the arrivals hall, such as it is, ushers you straight ahead through the double doors and into the car park. Here, unless you miraculously have your own limo waiting for you (or a strategically placed friend waiting in a revving Skoda, for example), you have one of two options to get to your accommodation in the centre:

 – Taxi

You will have no difficulty spotting the taxi rank immediately outside arrivals. The official price a Slovak pays to get from the airport to a destination within the city centre is between 8 and 10 Euros one-way. However, you are probably not Slovak (the chances of this, after all, on a worldwide scale, are limited) and you are coming from the airport. Prices to city centre destinations will vary between 15 Euros, if you bargain hard and the destination really is central, to 25 Euros, if the taxi driver thinks he can milk you for extra Euros and the destination is slightly beyond the centre, for example Koliba. Taxi drivers are, in my personal experience, relatively unlikely to speak much English (nothing against that – just sayin’). For taxi rides, it’s best to come armed with cash (two 10 Euro notes and change in 1 Euro coins would be ideal)  

– Bus

For buses, walk across the taxi rank/pick-up/drop-off  road (using the pedestrian crossing) to the second pavement. Turn right. Walk along (just where the happy chappy with the wheelie bag in the picture is going) until you see the bus stop for busses to all city destinations at the end of the pavement. There is a shelter, some ticket machines and several other anxious first-time visitors like yourself waiting there, along with the usual group of grimly determined locals (to be joined by a lot of exuberant teenagers just one stop later when you pass the nearby Avion Shopping Centre). A word about the ticket machines. They do not take credit cards, British pounds, American dollars, forints or indeed any other currency than Euros. So have some Euro change handy. For journeys of 15 minutes or less, press the button for the 0.70 Euro ticket. For journeys of 15 minutes up to one hour (into which category any journey to the city centre, including yours, will almost certainly fall) get the option for the 0.90 Euro ticket.

Remember that you must validate your bus ticket on-board for bus 61 and any Bratislava city public transport. If you don’t validate the ticket (you’ll see the little validation machines by the doors on the bus) your ticket will be essentially invalid and you can face a 50 Euro+ fine! OK. Now you are ready to get your bus.

Now, in the paragraph when I mentioned city destinations? That was a bit of an exaggeration because really there’s actually only four options by bus from Bratislava Airport:

1: The Bratislava to Vienna Express Bus

This bus, run by Slovaklines in conjunction with Eurolines, runs between Bratislava Airport and Vienna’s central train station, Vienna HBF. En route, it will stop in Bratislava at the bus station and then the train station, in the town of Hainburg just across the border in Austria (that’s where Slovaks go to do shopping because… no, no, that’s another article), at Vienna’s Schwechat Airport and then on to the centre of Vienna at Vienna HBF (Hauptbahnhof, the main central train station). Here is a link to the latest timetable for the route. The first bus is 8:30am from the airport; the last is 9:35pm (so for the late-night flights arriving from the UK this option won’t be possible; you’ll need to wait an hour for the last Blaguss service, below). Journey time to central Bratislava is 30 minutes and to central Vienna one hour 30 minutes (three services stop at Erdbergstrasse, which is 1:10, but to Vienna HBF it’s 1:30). The full journey from Bratislava to central Vienna costs 7.50 Euros (luggage is 1 Euro extra). If you’re headed to the city centre, you can take this option too but there is little point as Bus 61 below is cheaper and more frequent. There are 7 services between Bratislava Airport and central Vienna daily.

2: Blaguss to Vienna

This service offers almost exactly the same route as the Slovaklines Bratislava-Vienna bus above: only with even fewer stops (and also 7.50 Euros to central Vienna). This service just calls at the airport, Most SNP bus station, Petržalka Einsteinova, Vienna’s Schwechat Airport and central Vienna’s Erdbergstrasse. Here’s a link to the latest timetable for the route. The first bus is an incredible 4am from Bratislava Airport, the last is 22:45. Bratislava airport-central Vienna travel time is billed as one hour 15 minutes although in reality this can take a little longer. There are 14 services between Bratislava Airport and central Vienna daily.

3: Bus No 61

This Bratislava city bus links the airport (signposted only as “letisko” in Bratislava) with the train station and runs up until at least midnight. This bus runs every 15 minutes but can get crowded. Try and get a seat (at the airport you should be able to) and keep your luggage in sight. The following stop (in Slovak: zastávka) will be announced on a very futuristic talking scoreboard (wo, yeah!) The stop of interest you will need to watch out for is Račianske Mýto (the name translates as Rača tollway because in times gone by this would have demarcated the edge of Bratislava and Rača (now a suburb) would have been a separate settlement). Get off at Račianske Mýto to change for connections to the city centre. Otherwise this bus continues to, you’ve guessed it, the train station (Hlavná Stanica).

From where the bus drops you on the far side of Račianske Mýto*, you have to double half-way back across the main road to the tram line to catch the tram to the city centre. You’ll see which way the trams are heading and you want those that are heading right (as you stand with your back to the terrible-looking restaurant and the park, facing the way you’ve come) to take you direct into the city centre. Getting tram number 5 is best (although tram 3 will also take you to the centre). After three stops on tram 5 (trams every 10 min or so, your ticket you got at the airport still covers you) you’ll enter the pedestrianised Obchodná street. Get off at the second stop on this street (so four after Račianske Mýto) at the stop called Postová for destinations in the Old Town centre. At Postová, continue to the next big crossroads (a beautiful church known as Kostol Nasvätejšej Trojice is now on your right) and straight across the tram lines is the very pretty entrance to Bratislava Old Town.

*You can get off Bus 61 earlier than Račianske Mýto, at Trnavské Mýto, and change for tram 4, which will bring you down into the centre by the Danube and the bridge across it of Most SNP (aka the UFO and it really does look like one). However, it’s slightly more complicated to give directions from Trnavské Mýto so Englishmaninslovakia recommends Račianske Mýto to change at…

4: Bus 96 to Petržalka

You are very unlikely to need the bus out to Petržalka (more, much more on Petržalka in other forthcoming posts, including the lovely cycle ride from Petržalka to Danubiana Art Museum or the new tram line that’s set to connect Petržalka with the city centre by 2016) when you first arrive in Bratislava but there is that option too.

Right. You’ve arrived. Thank Goodness for that.

RELATED POST: Every other public transport connection in Bratislava you are ever likely to need

RELATED POST: How To Get to Bratislava’s Main Hotels

Mastering Bratislava’s Public Transport Part One: From the Airport to the City Centre

Bratislava Airport Arrivals!!

Bratislava Airport Arrivals!!

After the confusion I have had myself over the years, I thought a few notes on Bratislava’s actually very good but initially flummoxing public transport system might come in handy. There is very little thorough info in English on the web so: voila. This first post is about getting from the airport (which is the way nearly all Brits arrive) to the centre.

Arriving at Bratislava’s Airport

Slovakia does not have its own airline, meaning Ryanair has almost become the (bone-shakingly bumpy) substitute. Don’t worry though: most flights still land with almost zero fatality rate. There is a reason a lot of British visitors arrive by air other than simple logistics: Bratislava is connected to London Luton, London Stansted, Birmingham, Liverpool and Edinburgh – making the UK easily the most connected country to Slovakia by air. (NB – you can also fly from London to Košice and from London to Poprad in the High Tatras).

Once through customs, the arrivals hall, such as it is, ushers you straight ahead through the double doors and into the car park. Here, unless you miraculously have your own limo waiting for you (or a strategically placed friend waiting in a revving Skoda, for example), you have one of two options to get to your accommodation in the centre:

 – Taxi

You will have no difficulty spotting the taxi rank immediately outside arrivals. The official price a Slovak pays to get from the airport to a destination within the city centre is between 8 and 10 Euros one-way. However, you are probably not Slovak (the chances of this, after all, on a worldwide scale, are limited) and you are coming from the airport. Prices to city centre destinations will vary between 15 Euros, if you bargain hard and the destination really is central, to 25 Euros, if the taxi driver thinks he can milk you for extra Euros and the destination is slightly beyond the centre, for example Koliba. Taxi drivers are, in my personal experience, relatively unlikely to speak much English (nothing against that – just sayin’). For taxi rides, it’s best to come armed with cash (two 10 Euro notes and change in 1 Euro coins would be ideal)  

– Bus

For buses, walk across the taxi rank/pick-up/drop-off  road (using the pedestrian crossing) to the second pavement. Turn right. Walk along (just where the happy chappy with the wheelie bag in the picture is going) until you see the bus stop for busses to all city destinations at the end of the pavement. There is a shelter, some ticket machines and several other anxious first-time visitors like yourself waiting there, along with the usual group of grimly determined locals (to be joined by a lot of exuberant teenagers just one stop later when you pass the nearby Avion Shopping Centre). A word about the ticket machines. They do not take credit cards, British pounds, American dollars, forints or indeed any other currency than Euros. So have some Euro change handy. For journeys of 15 minutes or less, press the button for the 0.70 Euro ticket. For journeys of 15 minutes up to one hour (into which category any journey to the city centre, including yours, will almost certainly fall) get the option for the 0.90 Euro ticket.

Remember that you must validate your bus ticket on-board for bus 61 and any Bratislava city public transport. If you don’t validate the ticket (you’ll see the little validation machines by the doors on the bus) your ticket will be essentially invalid and you can face a 50 Euro fine! OK. Now you are ready to get your bus.

Now, in the paragraph when I mentioned city destinations? That was a bit of an exaggeration because really there’s actually only four options by bus from Bratislava Airport:

1: The Bratislava to Vienna Express Bus

This bus, run by Slovaklines in conjunction with Eurolines, runs between Bratislava Airport and Vienna’s Sudtiroler Platz. En route, it will stop in Bratislava at the bus station and then the train station, in the town of Hainburg just across the border in Austria (that’s where Slovaks go to do shopping because… no, no, that’s another blog post), at Vienna’s Schwechat Airport and then on to the centre of Vienna at Sudtiroler Platz. Here is a link to the latest timetable for the route. The first bus is 8:30am from the airport; the last is 9:35pm (so for the late-night flights arriving from the UK this option won’t be possible; you’ll need to wait an hour for the last Blaguss service, below). Journey time to central Bratislava is 30 minutes and to central Vienna one hour 35-one hour 55 minutes (three services stop at Erdbergstrasse, which is 1:35, but to Sudtiroler Platz it’s 1:55). The full journey from Bratislava to central Vienna costs 7.70 Euros (luggage is 1 Euro extra). If you’re headed to the city centre, you can take this option too but there is little point as Bus 61 below is cheaper and more frequent.

2: Blaguss to Vienna

This service offers almost exactly the same route as the Slovaklines Bratislava-Vienna bus above: only with even fewer stops (perhaps why they charge a hefty 2 Euros more: 10 Euros to central Vienna). This service just calls at the airport, Most SNP bus station, Petržalka Einsteinova, Vienna’s Schwechat Airport and central Vienna’s Erdbergstrasse. Here’s a link to the latest timetable for the route. The first bus is an incredible 4am from Bratislava Airport, the last is 22:45. Bratislava airport-central Vienna travel time is billed as one hour 15 minutes although in reality this can take a little longer.

3: Bus No 61

This Bratislava city bus links the airport (signposted only as “letisko” in Bratislava) with the train station and runs up until at least midnight. This bus runs every 15 minutes but can get crowded. Try and get a seat (at the airport you should be able to) and keep your luggage in sight. The following stop (in Slovak: zastávka) will be announced on a very futuristic talking scoreboard (wo, yeah!) The stop of interest you will need to watch out for is Račianske Mýto (the name translates as Rača tollway because in times gone by this would have demarcated the edge of Bratislava and Rača, where I live (now a suburb) would have been a separate settlement). Get off at Račianske Mýto to change for connections to the city centre. Otherwise this bus continues to, you’ve guessed it, the train station (Hlavná Stanica).

From where the bus drops you on the far side of Račianske Mýto*, you have to double half-way back across the main road to the tram line to catch the tram to the city centre. You’ll see which way the trams are heading and you want those that are heading right (as you stand with your back to the terrible-looking restaurant and the park, facing the way you’ve come) to take you direct into the city centre. Getting tram number 5 is best (although tram 3 will also take you to the centre). After three stops on tram 5 (trams every 10 min or so, your ticket you got at the airport still covers you) you’ll enter the pedestrianised Obchodná street. Get off at the second stop on this street (so four after Račianske Mýto) at the stop called Postová for destinations in the Old Town centre. At Postová, continue to the next big crossroads (a beautiful church known as Kostol Nasvätejšej Trojice is now on your right) and straight across the tram lines is the very pretty entrance to Bratislava Old Town.

*You can get off Bus 61 earlier than Račianske Mýto, at Trnavské Mýto, and change for tram 4, which will bring you down into the centre by the Danube and the bridge across it of Most SNP (aka the UFO and it really does look like one). However, it’s slightly more complicated to give directions from Trnavské Mýto so Englishmaninslovakia recommends Račianske Mýto to change at…

4: Bus 96 to Petržalka

You are very unlikely to need the bus out to Petržalka (more, much more on Petržalka in other forthcoming posts, including the lovely cycle ride from Petržalka to Danubiana Art Museum or the new tram line that’s set to connect Petržalka with the city centre) when you first arrive in Bratislava but there is that option too.

Right. You’ve arrived. Thank Goodness for that.

RELATED POST: Every other public transport connection in Bratislava you are ever likely to need

RELATED POST: How To Get to Bratislava’s Main Hotels

800px-Kosice_airport

Flights: Košice’s Connections – The Latest (2016 Update)

When Košice got a new flight connection from London Luton, you heard it here first: almost a year before it happened! It seemed when that route began operating in autumn 2013 that Slovakia’s second city was really making moves to turn its airport into a serious international airport – fitting, as it was in 2013 that it was European city of culture. You can still read the original post below, and the comments related to it, but Englishmaninslovakia moves on and three years on we want to let you know about the new routes that are cementing Košice’s status as a significant air hub in Eastern Europe (one of the five fastest-growing airports in ALL Europe in 2014, you know).

As for 2016, there are a couple of great new air routes which will aid travellers to better plan their trip to Košice. One – the direct connection with Warsaw – is already in action. More on the other route nearer the time it starts running!

Košice – the best possible introduction!

The Latest 2016 Routes

Košice-Warsaw: (Poland) New as of March 2016!  Departure times from Košice will be at 05:35 on Monday through Saturday AND departure times from Warsaw will be 22:35 on Sunday through Friday.

The New 2015 Routes

As of June 2015, there will be flights between Košice and the UK’s Doncaster-Sheffield Robin Hood and Bristol Airports – also operated by Wizz Air, who run the now-successful Košice-London Luton route. (NB: the Košice-Milan Bergamo route is not running in 2016).

Košice-Doncaster-Sheffield Robin Hood: (UK) Operates twice weekly; departure times from Košice will be 19:00 on Tuesdays and Saturdays AND departure times from Doncaster-Sheffield Robin Hood 21:15 on Tuesdays and Saturdays. OPERATED BY WIZZ AIR

Košice-Bristol: (UK) Operates twice weekly from October 2015 (although didn’t start running in 2016 until April); departure times from Košice will be 19:00 on Mondays and Fridays AND departure times from Bristol will be 21:20 on Mondays and Fridays (and are scheduled for the rest of 2016 calendar year). From a ridiculously cheap 29 Euros!! OPERATED BY WIZZ AIR

Košice’s Other Flight Routes

Košice-London Luton: (UK) Currently operates at least daily. Departure times from Košice are 06:10 (Mon-Sat) and 06:10/19:00 (Sun) (mid-Sep-June) and 06:10/19:00 (Sun/Wed) /  06:10 (Mon-Tue/Thu-Sat) (July-mid-September) AND departure times from London Luton are 14:55 daily (Mon-Sat) and 14:55/21:10 (Sun) (mid-Sep-June) and 14:55/21:10 (Sun/Wed) / 14:55 (Mon-Tue/Thu-Sat) (July-mid-September) OPERATED BY WIZZ AIR

Košice-Vienna: (Austria) Currently operates on average twice daily during the week and once daily at weekends. Departure times from Košice are 05:00/15:10 (Mon-Fri) / 15:10 (Sat/Sun) AND departure times from Vienna are 12:55/22:15 (Sun-Tue & Thu-Fri) OPERATED BY AUSTRIAN AIRLINES

Košice-Prague: (Czech Republic) Currently operates two direct flights daily (plus two more daily that go through Bratislava). Direct flight departure times are 05:00/14:55 (Mon-Fri) / 05:00 (Sat) / 14:55 (Sun) AND departure times from Prague are 12:15/22:05 (Sun-Fri) (no flights on Saturdays) OPERATED BY CZECH AIRLINES

Košice-Bratislava: (Slovakia) The two afore-mentioned non-direct Czech Airlines flights between Košice and Prague stop in Bratislava Mondays to Fridays. This is Slovakia’s only real internal flight connection but we’re not going to champion its cause here. Why? Because you will save a maximum of one hour, if you’re lucky, over the fast train from Bratislava, because it’s prohibitively expensive (the train ride is a mere 20 Euros) and because it’s not ecological! TAKE THE TRAIN FROM HLAVNA STANICA

 

A Quick Guide to the Other Content We Have on Košice

Places to Go: Climbing Košice cathedral

Places to Go: Unsung charms and legends: insights into Košice city centre

Places to Go/Events & Festivals: Slovakia’s Famed Film Festival Arrives in Košice to Stay

Places to Stay: The city’s first ‘eco-hotel’

Places to Eat & Drink: Košice’s most imaginative breakfast stop

Places to Eat & Drink: THE bistro to be seen at in Košice

Getting Around: Quirky Košice city tours

Musings: The Definition of ‘Discussed’

 

AND…

The Original Post from November 2012…

London to Košice Flights!

A little birdie (but a very knowledgeable and reliable birdie) tells me flights from London to Košice are starting up next year, with the official announcement to be made in early January after negotiations conclude at the end of this year. March is the projected date for flights to commence. Currently Košice is served from Prague (by Czech Airlines), Vienna (by Austrian Airlines) and otherwise only Bratislava.

It’s been a while coming. Košice’s train connections from Bratislava even with the faster IC-trains, are rarely under five hours and often delayed (speaking as someone who has had to stand from Košice to Trenčin, aka almost-the-whole-way-across-the-country, I can tell you that is not fun). If Košice is serious about attracting international visitors next year for its year as European City of Culture, this is what it needs. Given Slovakia takes six or seven hours to traverse from end to end overland, a Košice flight to another major transport hub is nigh-on essential. Especially when you consider neighbouring Poland has loads of destinations served by cheap flights including plenty to the UK: you can imagine there would be a healthy market for a Košice-London connection. Probably you’d get some Ukrainians coming across to make the most of it too, given it’s only a couple of hours from Košice and bargain flights are hard to come by in the Ukraine unless you want to go to, ah, Russia.

Bargain flights. Hmmm. We know what’s coming, don’t we? But please tell me Ryanair are not the airline being negotiated with. Please. As you will gather from my recent post on cheap flights, what Slovakia needs is an airline that gives visitors a first impression that ISN’T, well, blue-and-yellow plastic, zero leg room and scratch card announcements. I’m a big advocate of budget flights, don’t get me wrong. But when a country is essentially served ONLY by cheap flights, and cheap flights from one source at that, then there’s something wrong. Let’s not assume that visitors to/residents in Košice are only concerned with low prices and aren’t bothered about low quality.

UPDATE WINTER 2013: To confirm the below comments, there are flights running with Wizz Air from London Luton to Košice. Flights (from London Luton) run at 14:10 now on Sundays, Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.